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Musk says LA Hyperloop tunnel to be unveiled December 10

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop ultra high-speed transport system will be unveiled in Los Angeles in early December with free test rides to the public, the entrepreneur announced.

Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI

Researchers commonly study brain function by monitoring two types of electromagnetism—electric fields and light. However, most methods for measuring these phenomena in the brain are very invasive.

Origami cushions protect drones from collisions

To protect flying robots without hindering their flight, Imperial experts found answers in the ancient art of origami.

Origami, 3-D printing merge to make complex structures in one shot

By merging the ancient art of origami with 21st century technology, researchers have created a one-step approach to fabricating complex origami structures whose light weight, expandability, and strength could have applications …

Artificial intelligence—parking a car with only 12 neurons

Computer scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) are improving artificial intelligence by drawing inspiration from biology. The new approaches achieve amazing results with surprisingly little effort.

BinaryGAN: a generative adversarial network with binary neurons

Researchers at the Research Center for IT Innovation of Academia Sinica, in Taiwan, have recently developed a novel generative adversarial network (GAN) that has binary neurons at the output layer of the generator. This model, …

Samsung 7nm EUV LPP spells out new day for its chip-making future

The wraps are off Samsung’s 7nm LPP EUV process, which has been years in development. The news is that Samsung has now swung into the next stage of producing chips using that process.

3-D bioprinting technique could create artificial blood vessels, organ tissue

University of Colorado Boulder engineers have developed a 3-D printing technique that allows for localized control of an object’s firmness, opening up new biomedical avenues that could one day include artificial arteries …

Patent talk shows Samsung’s ideas for future phone design

Look what Samsung’s future phones might look like, if patent talk is anything to go by. A Samsung patent filed with WIPO for a “Biometric sensor and device including the same” was published October 18.

Americans lose confidence they can sniff out social media bots

How times have changed. Just a few years ago, Americans were uncomfortably amused at the presence of social bots but were confident they could tell tofu from prime rib.

Researchers demonstrate 120-kilowatt wireless charging for vehicles

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a 120-kilowatt wireless charging system for vehicles—providing six times the power of previous ORNL technology and a big step toward …

Clapping Music app reveals that changing rhythm isn’t so easy

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have developed an app to understand why some rhythms are more difficult to perform than others.

A new strategy to correct imperfections in occupancy grid maps

Researchers at Laboratório de Computação de Alto Desempenho (LCAD) of Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), in Brazil, have devised a novel strategy for correcting imperfections in occupancy grid maps by correcting …

How your little email server puts you in charge

Helm is a startup that wants to satisfy people who dream of having ownership of their email content. Companies hold your data on their servers; this Helm concept is the price you would pay for turning that around, where you …

Neural network that securely finds potential drugs could encourage large-scale pooling of sensitive data

MIT researchers have developed a cryptographic system that could help neural networks identify promising drug candidates in massive pharmacological datasets, while keeping the data private. Secure computation done at such …

Researchers put forward a roadmap for quantum internet development

A quantum internet may very well be the first quantum information technology to become reality. Researchers at QuTech in Delft, the Netherlands, today published a comprehensive guide toward this goal in Science. It describes …

First proof of quantum computer advantage

For many years, quantum computers were not much more than an idea. Today, companies, governments and intelligence agencies are investing in the development of quantum technology. Robert König, professor for the theory of …

3D-printed supercapacitor electrode breaks records in lab tests

Scientists at UC Santa Cruz and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have reported unprecedented performance results for a supercapacitor electrode. The researchers fabricated electrodes using a printable graphene …

Researchers show what can happen when a drone collides with an airplane

A team at the University of Dayton Research Institute has created a video showing what can happen to an airplane when it collides with a drone. They have presented their findings along with the video at this year’s Unmanned …

SLAP: Simultaneous Localization and Planning for autonomous robots

Researchers at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Texas A&M University, and Carnegie Mellon University recently carried out a research project aimed at enabling simultaneous localization and planning (SLAP) capabilities …

MELT 3-D printer designed for use in microgravity

Europe’s first 3D printer designed for use in weightlessness, printing aerospace-quality plastics, has won the prestigious Aerospace Applications Award from design-to-manufacturing specialist TCT Magazine.

Qualcomm unwraps chipsets, talks up 60GHz WiFi solutions

Qualcomm is talking up their new chipsets; the company has announced its 60GHz Wi-Fi chipsets.

Carbon fiber can store energy in the body of a vehicle

A study led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has shown that carbon fibres can work as battery electrodes, storing energy directly. This opens up new opportunities for structural batteries, where the carbon fibre …

‘DAWG’ system aims to prevent attacks made possible by Meltdown and Spectre

In January the technology world was rattled by the discovery of Meltdown and Spectre, two major security vulnerabilities in the processors that can be found in virtually every computer on the planet.

3D-printed lithium-ion batteries

Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially …

Oculus co-founder Brendan Iribe joins exodus from Facebook

A co-founder of Facebook’s virtual-reality division is joining the exodus of executives to leave the company after striking it rich in lucrative sales of their startups.

Netflix to borrow another $2B to pay its programming bills

Netflix plans to borrow another $2 billion to help pay for the exclusive series and movies that its management credits for helping its video streaming service reel in millions of new subscribers during the past five years.

Industrial robots increase wages for employees

In addition to increasing productivity, the introduction of industrial robots has increased wages for the employees. At the same time, industrial robots have also changed the labour market by increasing the number of job …

Turning ‘big brother’ surveillance into a helping hand to the homeless

Surveillance evokes fear of a “big brother” state watching our every move. The proliferation of closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras in our cities and the emergence of big data have only deepened this fear. Marginalised …

Some cybersecurity apps could be worse for privacy than nothing at all

It’s been a busy few weeks for cybersecurity researchers and reporters. There was the Facebook hack, the Google plus data breach, and allegations that the Chinese government implanted spying chips in hardware components.

Ryanair’s Dutch-based cabin crews to strike Tuesday

Ryanair’s Dutch-based cabin crews Monday announced a last minute 24-hour strike to protest the Irish budget airline’s decision to close its base in the southern city of Eindhoven.

Offshore wind farms to test business in deep water

As wind turbines become increasingly familiar sights along shorelines, developers of offshore floating platforms, which harness the powerful winds further out to sea, are seeking to establish their technologies as a major …

Japan orders Facebook to improve data protection

The Japanese government on Monday ordered Facebook to improve protection of users’ personal information following data breaches affecting tens of millions of people worldwide.

Japan firms fined $3.4 million over maglev bid-rigging

Two major construction companies were Monday ordered to pay fines totalling more than $3 million for colluding to win contracts on Japan’s multi-billion-dollar maglev project.

AI and human creativity go hand in hand

What does AI look like? You might say it looks like a robot, or flashing LEDs, or a waveform on a screen. But what would AI say AI looks like? To find out, IBM Research asked AI to draw us a picture… of itself. AI’s self-portrait …

Fiat sells auto parts unit to Japan’s Calsonic for 6.2 bn euros

Fiat Chrysler said Monday it was selling its Italian auto parts unit Magneti Marelli to Japan’s Calsonic Kansei (CK) in a deal worth 6.2 billion euros.

Electronics giant Philips posts mixed results in Q3

Dutch electronics giant Philips, which is focusing its business on medical equipment and services, on Monday posted higher third quarter sales but profits dipped due to currency headwinds.

Ryanair first-half profits fall 7% after widespread strikes

Ryanair’s first half to September profits fell seven percent to €1.2 billion, the low-cost airline announced Monday, after widespread strike action by pilots and cabin crew disrupted operations.

Germany urges global minimum tax for digital giants

German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said in an interview for publication Sunday he backed a global minimum fiscal regime for multinationals as Europe looks to levy tax notably on US tech giants.

Facebook does, indeed, want to track your calls on device

Facebook wants to you to spend $199 to $349 to install its version of a connected, talking video speaker—such as Amazon’s Echo—into your home. It has a camera that follows you as you move for video calls and the ability …

Facebook hires British ex-deputy PM as global affairs head

British former deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, a leading anti-Brexit advocate, said on Friday he would be starting a job at Facebook, as the US giant faces up to regulatory pressures.

Hydrogen car prototype

Researchers at the Institute of Chemical Technology and collaborators have successfully developed and tested a scale car prototype that stores and generates hydrogen safely and is capable of using it as fuel.

Virtual learning robot for youngsters

Programming a robot: something most kids would love to do. “RosieReality” makes it possible – even if it’s only in augmented reality. The ETH spin-off plans to use the new technology to teach young kids about programming …

Mars likely to have enough oxygen to support life: study

Salty water just below the surface of Mars could hold enough oxygen to support the kind of microbial life that emerged and flourished on Earth billions of years ago, researchers reported Monday.

Mystery of how black widow spiders create steel-strength silk webs further unravelled

Researchers at Northwestern University and San Diego State University (SDSU) have better unraveled the complex process of how black widow spiders transform proteins into steel-strength fibers. This knowledge promises to aid …

Overspending on defense arsenal bankrupts a plant’s economy

Defend or grow? Can plants do both at the same time? Michigan State University scientists might be inching closer to answering these questions. The answers matter. They could someday help us understand natural ecosystems …

Gravitational waves could soon provide measure of universe’s expansion

Twenty years ago, scientists were shocked to realize that our universe is not only expanding, but that it’s expanding fasterover time.

‘Himalayan Viagra’ under threat from climate change: researchers

A prized caterpillar fungus that is more valuable than gold and is nicknamed “Himalayan Viagra” in Asia, where it is seen as a wonder drug, is becoming harder to find due to climate change, researchers said Monday.

Researchers switch material from one state to another with a single flash of light

Scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, …

Fracking wastewater accumulation found in freshwater mussels’ shells

Elevated concentrations of strontium, an element associated with oil and gas wastewaters, have accumulated in the shells of freshwater mussels downstream from fracking wastewater disposal sites, according to researchers from …

HD 87240 is a chemically peculiar star with an overabundance of heavy elements, study suggests

European astronomers have conducted a chemical study of the star HD 87240, a member of the open cluster NGC 3114. The new research, which determined the abundances of several elements in HD 87240’s atmosphere, suggests that …

Structure of spherical viruses aren’t as perfect as we thought

Determining the structure of a virus is an important step in understanding and treating viral disease. For decades, structural biologists have been using cryo-electron microscopy to create increasingly accurate pictures of …

Secondary building units (SBUs)—the turning point in the development of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)

There is an urgent need to control materials on the molecular level to make “materials on demand.” A strategy to develop such materials is in development in reticular chemistry, derived from the Latin translation “reticulum” …

Study finds availability of nitrogen to plants is declining as climate warms

Researchers have found that global changes, including warming temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are causing a decrease in the availability of a key nutrient for terrestrial plants. This …

Spotlighting differences in closely-related species

There are millions of fungal species, and those few hundred found in the Aspergillus genus play important roles in areas ranging from industrial production to agricultural plant pathogens. Reported October 22, 2018, in Nature …

Scientists make new ‘green’ electronic polymer-based films with protein nanowires

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has produced a new class of electronic materials that may lead to a “green,” more sustainable future in biomedical and environmental sensing, …

Nanosized ferroelectrics become a reality

Using ferroelectricity instead of magnetism in computer memory saves energy. If ferroelectric bits were nanosized, this would also save space. But conventional wisdom dictates that ferroelectric properties disappear when …

Cells that change jobs to fight diabetes

Diabetes is characterized by persistent high blood sugar levels that occur when certain cells in the pancreas—the insulin-producing β cells—are destroyed or are no longer able to secrete insulin. Researchers at the University …

Ancient enzymes the catalysts for new discoveries

University of Queensland-led research recreating 450 million-year-old enzymes has resulted in a biochemical engineering ‘hack’ which could lead to new drugs, flavours, fragrances and biofuels.

Fish give up the fight after coral bleaching

Researchers found that when water temperatures heat up for corals, fish ‘tempers’ cool down, providing the first clear evidence of coral bleaching serving as a trigger for rapid change in reef fish behaviour.

Cellular trash cans reveal the roles of proteins in disease

If we really want to know how our body’s cells work—or don’t work, in the case of disease—we might need to look beyond their genes and even beyond the proteins they are made of. We may need to start going through the …

New protein sequencing method could transform biological research

A team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has demonstrated a new way to sequence proteins that is much more sensitive than existing technology, identifying individual protein molecules rather than requiring …

Scientist explores a better way to predict space weather

Findings recently published by a Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) space scientist shed new light on predicting the thermodynamics of solar flares and other “space weather” events involving hot, fast-moving plasmas.

Researchers wake-up DNA from soil bacteria to discover novel acid antibiotic

Scleric Acid has been discovered by capturing and engineering a DNA fragment from soil bacteria Streptomyces sclerotialus, and could help fight bacterial infections—by researchers at the School of Life Sciences and Department …

‘Oumuamua one year later

One year ago this week astronomers discovered an unusual object moving through space not too far from the Earth’s orbit. In just a few days they realized it could not be a normal asteroid or comet – its path showed that …

Gravitational waves could shed light on dark matter

The forthcoming Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be a huge instrument allowing astronomers to study phenomena including black holes colliding and gravitational waves moving through space-time. Researchers from …

Astronomers propose a new method for detecting black holes

A stellar mass black hole is a compact object with a mass greater than three solar masses. It is so dense and has such a powerful force of attraction that not even light can escape from it. They cannot be observed directly, …

Understanding the building blocks for an electronic brain

Computer bits are binary, with a value of zero or one. By contrast, neurons in the brain can have many internal states, depending on the input that they receive. This allows the brain to process information in a more energy-efficient …

Stephen Hawking’s wheelchair, thesis for sale

Stephen Hawking was a cosmic visionary, a figure of inspiration and a global celebrity.

Kes 75—Milky Way’s youngest pulsar exposes secrets of star’s demise

Scientists have confirmed the identity of the youngest known pulsar in the Milky Way galaxy using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This result could provide astronomers new information about how some stars end …

New technique reveals limb control in flies—and maybe robots

A new neural recording technique developed by EPFL bioengineers enables for the first time the comprehensive measurement of neural circuits that control limb movement. Tested on the fruit fly, results from the technique may …

Understanding architecture of cancer-linked BAF protein complexes provides insight into disease

In 2013, Broad Institute member Cigall Kadoch, then a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, discovered that approximately 20 percent of all human cancers involve mutations in a group of proteins called BAF, a complex …

One more reason to love the striped bass: Antimicrobials

It’s hard to think of a fish with a higher across-the-board value than the striped bass—or rockfish, as it’s known in the Chesapeake Bay region.

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