Tech – Scientific American

Medical & Biotech

How Can Science Help Reverse Blindness?

Medical & Biotech

How Can Science Help Reverse Blindness?

From bionic eyes to gene editing, how can we use science to bring back sight?

January 15, 2019 — Everyday Einstein Sabrina Stierwalt

Behavior & Society

The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be All Right

Behavior & Society

The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be All Right

A rigorous new paper uses a new scientific approach that shows the panic over teen screen time is likely overstated

January 15, 2019 — Lydia Denworth

Public Health

New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid Overdoses

Public Health

New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid Overdoses

The technology utilizes smartphone speakers and microphone to monitor breathing

January 11, 2019 — Dana G. Smith

RoboFossil Reveals Locomotion of Beast from Deep Time

Evolution

Modeling shows the 290-million-year-old Orobates had an advanced way of walking—revising an enduring view of how tetrapods colonized dry land

3 hours ago — Kate Wong

Medical & Biotech

How Can Science Help Reverse Blindness?

Medical & Biotech

How Can Science Help Reverse Blindness?

From bionic eyes to gene editing, how can we use science to bring back sight?

January 15, 2019 — Everyday Einstein Sabrina Stierwalt

Behavior & Society

The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be All Right

Behavior & Society

The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be All Right

A rigorous new paper uses a new scientific approach that shows the panic over teen screen time is likely overstated

January 15, 2019 — Lydia Denworth

Public Health

New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid Overdoses

Public Health

New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid Overdoses

The technology utilizes smartphone speakers and microphone to monitor breathing

January 11, 2019 — Dana G. Smith

Current Issue

Scientific American Volume 320, Issue 2

Feb 2019

Special Report

Videos

Ion Drive: The First Flight

Researchers from MIT have flown a plane with no moving parts for the first time. It is powered by an “ion drive” which uses high powered electrodes to ionise and accelerate air particles, creating an “ionic wind.” This wind drove a five-meter-wide craft across a sports hall. Unlike the ion drives which have powered space craft for decades, this new drive uses air as the accelerant. The researchers say it could power silent drones.



This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on November 21, 2018. It is a Nature Video production.

November 26, 2018

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