Science and Technology – The New York Times

Latest Articles

  1. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Is a Crowd Pleaser. He’s Also Obsessed With Death.

    This Canadian artist with Mexican roots is opening a show at the Hirshhorn that showcases his sometimes eerie melding of technology and human biology.

    By TED LOOS


  2. Bruno Latour, the Post-Truth Philosopher, Mounts a Defense of Science

    He spent decades deconstructing the ways that scientists claim their authority. Can his ideas help them regain that authority today?

    By AVA KOFMAN


  3. Will Deep-Fake Technology Destroy Democracy?

    Imagine if a doctored video of a politician appeared the day before an election. It’s everything Vladimir Putin ever dreamed of.

    By JENNIFER FINNEY BOYLAN


  4. Fact-Check

    ‘I Don’t Know That It’s Man-Made,’ Trump Says of Climate Change. It Is.

    On “60 Minutes,” President Trump backed off his claim that global warming is a hoax. But he also made several new assertions unsupported by science.

    By LISA FRIEDMAN


  5. E.P.A. to Eliminate Office That Advises Agency Chief on Science

    It’s the latest step by the Trump administration that appears to diminish the role of scientific research in policymaking.

    By CORAL DAVENPORT


  6. Review: In ‘Science Fair,’ High School Students Are World-Class Scholars

    Teenagers compete to see who will make the largest contribution to humanity.

    By TEO BUGBEE


  7. Advertising

    Role Models Tell Girls That STEM’s for Them in New Campaign

    The Ad Council — along with G.E., Google, IBM, Microsoft and Verizon — is trying to encourage girls ages 11 to 15 to get involved in science, technology, engineering and math.

    By JANE L. LEVERE


  8. Corner Office

    Rebecca Lynn of Canvas Ventures on Nuclear Reactors, Failure and Asking Questions

    The venture capitalist talks about going from “being a player on the field to being a coach” and what it’s like to see your company lose 98 percent of its value in one day.

    By DAVID GELLES


  9. From Norway, Eyes and Ears for Sick Students

    London Design Biennale will display a desktop unit that houses a camera, microphone and speaker to help connect with the classroom.

    By PENELOPE COLSTON


  10. Strong Women on the March at Seattle Art Fair

    In a city where power, gender and technology converge, artists ask hard questions about diversity.

    By KIRK JOHNSON


  1. Make Your Daughter Practice Math. She’ll Thank You Later.

    The way we teach math in America hurts all students, but it may be hurting girls the most.

    By BARBARA OAKLEY


  2. Trump Finally Picks a Science Adviser. And Scientists? They Seem Relieved.

    Kelvin Droegemeier, a well-regarded meteorologist, has a long research record. But his views on climate change are not well known.

    By CARL ZIMMER


  3. Lincoln Brower, Champion of the Monarch Butterfly, Dies at 86

    Dr. Brower was a leading expert on the monarch and its awe-inspiring migratory journey, which could cover thousands of miles.

    By NEIL GENZLINGER


  4. What Elon Musk Should Learn From the Thailand Cave Rescue

    Just because you’re a successful tech mogul doesn’t mean you know how to rescue kids trapped underground.

    By ZEYNEP TUFEKCI


  5. Women Making Science Videos on YouTube Face Hostile Comments

    After studying 23,005 comments left on videos about science and related topics, a researcher says, “I could see why people would not want to be on YouTube.”

    By ADRIANNE JEFFRIES


  6. The Science (and the Scientists) Behind ‘Ant-Man’

    A quantum physicist consulted with the filmmakers so that a surprising amount of the original film and its new sequel have a factual basis.

    By DARRYN KING


  7. Nonfiction

    Must Science Conflict With Spirituality?

    The astrophysicist and novelist Alan Lightman doesn’t think so. And his new book, “Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine,” explains why.

    By MICHAEL SHERMER


  8. James Gips, Who Extended Computer Use to the Disabled, Dies at 72

    He helped develop two technologies that allowed people who could not use a mouse to communicate with a computer, and thus with the world.

    By NEIL GENZLINGER


  9. Letter

    No Validity to Astrology

    An astronomy professor writes that too many people put aside their critical thinking in accepting it.


  10. How Universities Deal With Sexual Harassment Needs Sweeping Change, Panel Says

    Current policies and programs have failed overwhelmingly to address and prevent the problem, said a report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

    By PAM BELLUCK


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8835 results for sorted by

  1. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Is a Crowd Pleaser. He’s Also Obsessed With Death.

    This Canadian artist with Mexican roots is opening a show at the Hirshhorn that showcases his sometimes eerie melding of technology and human biology.

    By TED LOOS


  2. Bruno Latour, the Post-Truth Philosopher, Mounts a Defense of Science

    He spent decades deconstructing the ways that scientists claim their authority. Can his ideas help them regain that authority today?

    By AVA KOFMAN


  3. Will Deep-Fake Technology Destroy Democracy?

    Imagine if a doctored video of a politician appeared the day before an election. It’s everything Vladimir Putin ever dreamed of.

    By JENNIFER FINNEY BOYLAN


  4. Fact-Check

    ‘I Don’t Know That It’s Man-Made,’ Trump Says of Climate Change. It Is.

    On “60 Minutes,” President Trump backed off his claim that global warming is a hoax. But he also made several new assertions unsupported by science.

    By LISA FRIEDMAN


  5. E.P.A. to Eliminate Office That Advises Agency Chief on Science

    It’s the latest step by the Trump administration that appears to diminish the role of scientific research in policymaking.

    By CORAL DAVENPORT


  6. Review: In ‘Science Fair,’ High School Students Are World-Class Scholars

    Teenagers compete to see who will make the largest contribution to humanity.

    By TEO BUGBEE


  7. Advertising

    Role Models Tell Girls That STEM’s for Them in New Campaign

    The Ad Council — along with G.E., Google, IBM, Microsoft and Verizon — is trying to encourage girls ages 11 to 15 to get involved in science, technology, engineering and math.

    By JANE L. LEVERE


  8. Corner Office

    Rebecca Lynn of Canvas Ventures on Nuclear Reactors, Failure and Asking Questions

    The venture capitalist talks about going from “being a player on the field to being a coach” and what it’s like to see your company lose 98 percent of its value in one day.

    By DAVID GELLES


  9. From Norway, Eyes and Ears for Sick Students

    London Design Biennale will display a desktop unit that houses a camera, microphone and speaker to help connect with the classroom.

    By PENELOPE COLSTON


  10. Strong Women on the March at Seattle Art Fair

    In a city where power, gender and technology converge, artists ask hard questions about diversity.

    By KIRK JOHNSON


  1. Make Your Daughter Practice Math. She’ll Thank You Later.

    The way we teach math in America hurts all students, but it may be hurting girls the most.

    By BARBARA OAKLEY


  2. Trump Finally Picks a Science Adviser. And Scientists? They Seem Relieved.

    Kelvin Droegemeier, a well-regarded meteorologist, has a long research record. But his views on climate change are not well known.

    By CARL ZIMMER


  3. Lincoln Brower, Champion of the Monarch Butterfly, Dies at 86

    Dr. Brower was a leading expert on the monarch and its awe-inspiring migratory journey, which could cover thousands of miles.

    By NEIL GENZLINGER


  4. What Elon Musk Should Learn From the Thailand Cave Rescue

    Just because you’re a successful tech mogul doesn’t mean you know how to rescue kids trapped underground.

    By ZEYNEP TUFEKCI


  5. Women Making Science Videos on YouTube Face Hostile Comments

    After studying 23,005 comments left on videos about science and related topics, a researcher says, “I could see why people would not want to be on YouTube.”

    By ADRIANNE JEFFRIES


  6. The Science (and the Scientists) Behind ‘Ant-Man’

    A quantum physicist consulted with the filmmakers so that a surprising amount of the original film and its new sequel have a factual basis.

    By DARRYN KING


  7. Nonfiction

    Must Science Conflict With Spirituality?

    The astrophysicist and novelist Alan Lightman doesn’t think so. And his new book, “Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine,” explains why.

    By MICHAEL SHERMER


  8. James Gips, Who Extended Computer Use to the Disabled, Dies at 72

    He helped develop two technologies that allowed people who could not use a mouse to communicate with a computer, and thus with the world.

    By NEIL GENZLINGER


  9. Letter

    No Validity to Astrology

    An astronomy professor writes that too many people put aside their critical thinking in accepting it.


  10. How Universities Deal With Sexual Harassment Needs Sweeping Change, Panel Says

    Current policies and programs have failed overwhelmingly to address and prevent the problem, said a report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

    By PAM BELLUCK


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